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International acclaim from historians and authors

This is the post excerpt.

Welcome to our site. We hope you’ll sign up to follow our blog, and click to share with your friends and followers on Facebook and Twitter. You can learn more details about the book Abraham Lincoln and Mexico by clicking the link for the title to see international acclaim from historians and authors, and where you can “look inside” the Kindle version on Amazon. Thanks.PORTADA Abraham Lincoln and Mexico

Five facts students may not know about Abraham Lincoln

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The first reading of the Emancipation Proclamation before President Abraham Lincoln’s Cabinet, painted by F.B. Carpenter. (Library of Congress) (Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division/Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

Almost every USA high school student learns that Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on New Year’s Day in 1863, as discussed in national news media recently. But most students are unaware that Lincoln was also a supporter of Mexico, both before and during the US Civil War.

Lincoln’s support for Mexico is detailed in a book by historian/ educator Michael Hogan that examines archival documents to look at Lincoln as an international statesman, not just an iconic American political figure. Here are five facts from the book that students may not know, starting with Lincoln’s objections to the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848:

1. As a freshman member of Congress, Lincoln was willing to risk his political career by objecting to the ongoing Mexican-American War. His first major speech in Congress contained a series of resolutions the news media dubbed the “Spot Resolutions,” which detailed his objections to the war and demanded that President Polk identify the geographical spot where Polk told Congress that Mexico “invaded our territory and shed the blood of our fellow-citizens on our own soil.”

2. In his thorough research to prepare his resolutions, Lincoln determined that the 1836 Velasco Agreement forcing Mexican troops to withdraw to the Rio Grande was not a real treaty because Santa Anna was coerced to sign it after he was captured in the battle of San Jacinto, and the Mexican government had refused to ratify it.

3. Before his inauguration as president, Lincoln offered his friendship to Mexico during a meeting in Springfield, Illinois, in 1861 with Mexican ambassador Matías Romero, the first foreign envoy to meet with the president-elect.

4. After French troops drove Mexican President Juárez into exile, Lincoln and his cabinet maintained official neutrality with Mexico to keep France from supporting the Confederacy during the Civil War. However, Lincoln responded to Romero’s pleas for help and authorized covert aid to Mexico.

5. During the French occupation of Mexico, Mrs. Lincoln and President Lincoln held several private White House meetings with Romero and major US investors friendly to the Mexican cause. This enabled the 24-year-old Mexican envoy to ultimately raise $18 million to arm and supply the Republican Army, ending European presence in North America after Lincoln’s death. 

The print version of Dr. Hogan’s book is in the Lincoln Presidential Library and many public libraries and at colleges and universities. Educators in more than 150 schools have received electronic copies of the book free of charge from the Lincoln and Mexico Project (LAMP). We’re hoping that many of them will use the book this February to observe Lincoln’s birthday by stimulating classroom discussion about Lincoln and Mexico.

LAMP can also provide educators with a three-act student play focusing on the friendships between Mrs. Lincoln, President Lincoln, Romero, and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. The world premiere in 2017 wowed audiences and critics in Mexico, which has several statues honoring Lincoln. If you’re interested, we can also provide complete lesson plans based on the book and the play. All the materials are free for education purposes. Just send an email request to lamp@lincolnandmexicoproject.org.

Thanks, and best regards.

 

Abraham Lincoln and Mexico book is at Ford’s Theatre!

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Photo courtesy of fords.org

The Abraham Lincoln and Mexico book by historian/ educator Michael Hogan attracted more fans resulting from his appearance at 2018 International Book Fair (FIL) in Guadalajara, Mexico.

One is the Associate Director for Interpretive Resources at Ford’s Theatre in Washington DC, who saw the Facebook posts about Dr. Hogan at FIL and decided to buy the book for the historic theatre.

“Purchased! My colleagues at Ford’s Theatre and I are excited to read it,” David Patrick McKenzie commented. “If you find yourself in DC, please do let me know. Would love to say hi and show you around Ford’s.”

Who knows–maybe Dr. Hogan’s book examining Lincoln’s legacy of support for Mexico will become part of the theatre’s display of nearly 7,000 books about Lincoln.lincoln_custom

Photo courtesy of NPR

Part of the onsite interest at FIL came from a three-hour book signing event Nov. 30, where Dr. Hogan was able to chat with FIL visitors about the book and to autograph copies they bought. He also autographed copies of his 1997 book The Irish Soldiers of Mexico.

“It’s always rewarding to interact personally with readers at events big and small,” said Hogan. “And I’m excited about the many others who responded positively this week to postings on Facebook, especially from Ford’s Theatre.”

Many high school and college students visited with Dr. Hogan during the event including pupils from Colegio Cervantes, Colegio Alpes, as well as German exchange students from the University of San Diego, and young people from Tec de Monterrey and the University of Guadalajara.

While most of the adult visitors were from Mexico, conversing and buying Spanish language version of the book, there were expats from the American Society in Guadalajara and from Lake Chapala, as well as visitors from California and Texas. Photos from his appearance at FIL were featured on the official Facebook page for the book, which has 5,000 followers.

The nine-day International Book Fair is the largest and most important literary event in the Spanish speaking world. Since its founding in 1987, it has grown to attract nearly 1,000,000 visitors annually, 20,000 exhibitors and publishers from about 50 countries, more than 100 literary agents, and almost 2,000 journalists. La Perla bookstore in Guadalajara hosted Dr. Hogan’s book signing event at FIL and sells his books at its store in the trendy Chapultepec area of the city.

New Advisory Council members from USA, Ireland, and Mexico

 

LAMP Advisory Council members (l-r): Héctor García Chávez, Fiachra Keogh, and Noor Chehabeddine

The Lincoln and Mexico Project (LAMP) is proud to profile three more members of its international Advisory Council. They include a university professor from the United States, an international educator from Ireland, and an international student from Mexico. Their addition means LAMP now has Advisory Council members throughout North America, and even in Europe and Asia.

Dr. Héctor García Chávez is Director of the Latin American and Latinx Studies Program at Loyola University in Chicago, a Loyola Sujack Master Teacher, and was recently awarded The Ignatius Loyola Award for Excellence in Teaching. He is helping LAMP with strategies for using the book Abraham Lincoln and Mexico in Latin American Studies. He is also Director of the Undergraduate Spanish Program at Loyola University Chicago where he teaches courses on Spanish language, Latin American-Iberian Literatures, Queer Theory for the Spanish Major, Loyola’s Interdisciplinary Honours Program, and Women’s Studies/Gender Studies Undergraduate and Graduate Programs. He is a Programing Associate and Advisory Council Member of Lit&Luz Festivals (https://www.litluz.org/schedule-chicago-2018/), which take place in México City and Chicago with funding awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts. Also, he has invited celebrated Mexican writers Jorge Volpi, Margo Glantz, Ignacio Solares, Eloy Urroz, and Georgina García Gutiérrez to Loyola in collaboration with the Chicago Mexican Consulate and the UNAM-Chicago Campus where he is a Visiting Scholar.

Fiachra Keogh is a National University of Galway history graduate working with the Education and Training Board, Ireland (ETBI). He is experienced in cross border peace building projects including the facilitation of cross community dialogue groups, advocating on behalf of new and disadvantaged communities in Ireland, teaching history in high school in Mexico, and facilitating the integration of Congolese refugees into Irish society. His most recent project involved bringing a group of marginalized youth to work with the Enough Project on a campaign to promote peace and justice in Africa. The project entitled “The Human Cost of Electronics” was awarded the ECO UNESCO Young Environmentalist Community Development Award at the Mansion House in Dublin in May 2018.

Noor Chehabeddine is an international student at the American School Foundation of Guadalajara (ASFG), which uses the book Abraham Lincoln and Mexico in its US History and Advanced Placement United States History (APUSH) classes. While taking the APUSH class, she volunteered in early 2018 to help with LAMP social media efforts. Here’s what she says: “Being a high schooler in the APUSH course, I get to constantly benefit from LAMP. I aid with the spreading of the positive relation between Mexico and the United States through the running of the Pinterest and YouTube pages promoting Dr. Hogan’s book. It is a privilege to have access to the information in Abraham Lincoln and Mexico, and I therefore use these media accounts to spread it as much as possible.” We’re happy to have Noor’s student perspective and involvement.

Here’s the list of current Advisory Council members:

  1. Janet Layton Arribas, teacher, Pasadena, CA area
  2. Ronald Barnett, Ph.D. historian and former professor, Jocotopec, MX
  3. Stacy Ohrt Billingslea, drama teacher, Dhaka, India
  4. Shaun Arron Cassidy, social media marketing, San Diego, CA
  5. Clever Chavez Marin, historian and Mexican military expert, Zapopan, MX
  6. Noor Chehabeddine, Advanced Placement US History (APUSH) student, American School Foundation of Guadalajara (ASFG), Guadalajara, MX
  7. Mark Collins, Social Studies teacher, Washington DC area
  8. Sylvia N. Contreras, businesswoman, history activist, and LAMP PR representative, Long Beach, CA
  9. Robert DiYanni, Ph.D. Professor, and instructional consultant, Center for the Advancement of Teaching at NYU, New York City
  10. Heribert von Feilitzsch, historian, author, and business executive, Washington DC area
  11. Héctor García Chávez, Director, Latin American-Latinx Studies, Loyola University, Chicago, IL
  12. Carlos Gonzalez-Magallon, retired Mexican foreign service official, Ajijic, MX
  13. Rocìo Guenther, freelance journalist, San Antonio, TX
  14. Jorge Haynes, retired California State University administrator, Austin, TX
  15. Janet Heinze, international education consultant, Guadalajara, MX
  16. Javier Hernández, photojournalist and reporter, Chihuahua, MX
  17. Michael Hogan, historian and educator, Guadalajara, MX
  18. Fiachra Keogh, international educator, Galway Ireland
  19. Cindy A. Medina Gallardo, history activist, genealogist, and LAMP senior PR representative, Austin, TX
  20. Carlos Alberto Méndez Villa, Ministry of Culture, Chihuahua, MX
  21. Luciana Mendez, computer sciences student at DePaul University, Chicago, IL
  22. Liam O’Hara, high school Social Studies Department Head, ASFG, Guadalajara, MX
  23. Brenda Prado, APUSH student, ASFG, Guadalajara, MX
  24. Mark Sconce, author and retired businessman, Camarillo, CA
  25. Jason Silverman, Ph.D. retired university history professor, Rock Hill, SC
  26. Richard Stafford, retired journalist, Washington DC area
  27. Philip Stover, historian and retired deputy superintendent of San Diego Unified School System, Chihuahua, MX
  28. Isaias Torres, APUSH teacher, ASFG, Guadalajara, MX
  29. Christena Wiseman, retired high school educator, Reno, NV
  30. David Wogahn, digital publishing executive, Carlsbad, CA

 

Special Education Discount for 2018-2019

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The Lincoln and Mexico Project (LAMP) is offering a special education discount for the book Abraham Lincoln and Mexico during the 2018-2019 academic year.

Now, educators and students can click this link to see the special 99-cent student discount offer for the eBook version from LAMP. The award-winning eBook includes hundreds of active hyperlinks and citations to external reference sources.

In early September, LAMP began sending the discount offer by individual emails to educators across the USA with the following message:

 

Giving students access to archival documents is a great way to stimulate classroom discussion of facts overlooked or marginalized in textbooks, especially in courses covering 19th century US history and Latin American studies. This book by historian/ educator Michael Hogan contains 18 complete and unedited archival documents about relationships between the USA and Mexico from the 1820s through the 1860s, plus three archival maps and twelve archival photographs.

The documents disclose President Polk’s reasons for starting the Mexican-American War, explore Lincoln’s reasons for opposing that war, and reveal Lincoln’s support as president for exiled Mexican President Benito Juárez that helped end French occupation in Mexico. The book is in college and university libraries across the USA, in several public libraries, and in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library.

Here’s the list of almost 150 universities, colleges, and high schools that already have the book or are considering it for this academic year:

USA

Alabama

  1. Judson College, Marion AL
  2. Montgomery Public Schools, Montgomery AL

Arizona

  1. Academy of Tucson High School, Tucson AZ

Arkansas

  1. Bauxite Public Schools, Bauxite AR
  2. Hope Public Schools, Hope AR

California

  1. Abraham Lincoln High School, San Diego CA
  2. Apple Valley Unified School District, Apple Valley CA
  3. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona CA
  4. California State University-Channel Islands, Camarillo CA
  5. California State University-Dominguez Hills, Carson CA
  6. California State University-Fullerton, Fullerton CA
  7. California State University-Long Beach, Long Beach CA
  8. California State University-San Bernardino, San Bernardino CA
  9. Chadwick School, Palos Verdes CA
  10. Consumnes River College, Sacramento CA
  11. Coronado Unified School District, Coronado CA
  12. Crestview Preparatory School, La Cañada Flintridge CA
  13. La Sierra University, Riverside CA
  14. Legend College Preparatory, Cupertino CA
  15. Long Beach College, Long Beach CA
  16. Long Beach Unified School District, Long Beach CA
  17. Los Angeles Mission College, Los Angeles CA
  18. Los Angeles Valley College, Valley Glen CA
  19. Marymount California University, Rancho Palos Verdes CA
  20. Mira Costa College, Oceanside CA
  21. Moreno Valley Unified School District, Moreno Valley CA
  22. Newark Unified School District, Newark CA
  23. Palomar College, San Marcos CA
  24. Parajo Valley Unified School District, Watsonville CA
  25. Pasadena Independent School District, Pasadena CA
  26. San Diego Unified Public Schools District, San Diego CA
  27. Santa Ana College, Santa Ana CA
  28. Spirit Christian Academy, Tustin CA
  29. Sweetwater Unified High School District, Chula Vista CA
  30. Woodbury University, Burbank CA

Colorado

  1. Cherry Creek Schools, Denver CO
  2. Pikes Peak Community College, Colorado Springs CO

Connecticut

  1. Trinity College, Hartford CT

District of Columbia

  1. American University, Washington DC
  2. Sidwell Friends School, Washington DC

Florida

  1. Cypress Creek High School, Orlando FL
  2. Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton FL
  3. Keys Gate Charter High School, Homestead FL
  4. Manatee Technical College, Bradenton FL
  5. Port St. Lucie Public Schools, Port St. Lucie FL

Georgia

  1. Chattahoochee Technical College, Rockmart GA
  2. Clayton State University, Morrow GA
  3. Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw GA
  4. University of Georgia, Athens GA
  5. University of West Georgia, Carrollton GA

Illinois

  1. Acero Schools, Chicago IL
  2. Bogan Computer Technical High School, Chicago IL
  3. Heartland Community College, Normal IL
  4. University of Illinois, Bloomington/Normal IL
  5. Loyola University of Chicago, Chicago IL
  6. McClure Junior High School, Western Springs IL
  7. Saint Xavier University, Chicago IL
  8. Williams Prep School of Medicine, Chicago IL

Indiana

  1. Tri-West Middle School, Lizton IN

Iowa

  1. Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines IA

Kansas

  1. Wichita Public Schools-USD259, Wichita KS

Louisiana

  1. Ouachita Parish School District, Monroe LA

Maryland

  1. Baltimore City Public Schools, Baltimore MD
  2. University of Maryland Graduate School, College Park MD
  3. U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis MD

Massachusetts

  1. Boston Public Schools, Boston MA
  2. Boston University, Boston MA
  3. Norwood Public Schools, Boston MA
  4. Springfield Central High School, Springfield MA
  5. Summit Educational Group, Newton MA

Michigan

  1. Deerfield High School, Deerfield MI
  2. Lawrence Technology University, Southfield MI
  3. Michigan State University, East Lansing MI
  4. Muskegon Community College, Muskegon MI
  5. Saginaw Public School System, Saginaw MI

Minnesota

  1. Henry Sibley High School, Mendota Heights MN

Mississippi

  1. Alcorn State University, Lorman MS
  2. Forest High School, Forest MS

Missouri

  1. Affton School District, Chesterfield MO
  2. Columbia College, Columbia MO

New Hampshire

  1. Southern New Hampshire University, Manchester NH

New Jersey

  1. Alvirne High School, Hudson NJ
  2. Essex County College, Newark NJ
  3. Monsignor Donovan High School, Toms River NJ
  4. Wayne Hills High School, Montclair NJ

New Mexico

  1. New Mexico Junior College, Hobbs NM
  2. Sandia Preparatory School, Albuquerque NM

New York

  1. Columbia University, Brooklyn NY
  2. New York City Department of Education, New York NY
  3. Preston High School, Bronx NY
  4. Unatego Central School District, Unatego NY

North Carolina

  1. East Carolina University, Greenville NC
  2. University of North Carolina, Charlotte NC

Ohio

  1. Ohio State University-Newark Campus, Newark OH
  2. University of Rio Grande, Rio Grande OH

Oregon

  1. Dallas School District, Dallas OR

Pennsylvania

  1. Central Dauphin School District, Harrisburg PA
  2. Chester Senior High School, Chester PA
  3. Community College of Allegheny County Pennsylvania, West Mifflin PA
  4. Haverford School, Haverford PA
  5. Pennsylvania Leadership Charter School, West Chester PA
  6. U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute, Carlisle Barracks PA

Rhode Island

  1. Brown University, Providence RI
  2. Rogers High School, Newport RI

South Carolina

  1. Chester Senor High School, Chester SC
  2. Senaca High School, Senaca SC

South Dakota

  1. Pierre School District, Pierre SD

Tennessee

  1. Sequatchie County Public Schools, Dunlap TN

Texas

  1. Aransas County ISD, Rockport TX
  2. Austin Community College-Pinnacle Campus, Austin TX
  3. Brookhaven College, Farmers Branch TX
  4. Goodrich Independent School District, Goodrich TX
  5. Houston Community College, Houston TX
  6. KIPP Houston Public Schools, Houston TX
  7. Lamar CISD, Rosenberg TX
  8. McMurry University, Abilene TX
  9. North Texas University, Dallas TX
  10. Pasadena Independent School District, Pasadena TX
  11. Round Rock ISD, Round Rock TX
  12. Sam Houston State University, Huntsville TX
  13. Terrill Independent School District, Terrell TX
  14. Texas A&M University, San Antonio TX
  15. University of Houston-Downtown, Houston TX
  16. University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington TX
  17. University of Texas-El Paso, El Paso TX

Virginia

  1. Chantilly High School, Chantilly VA
  2. Emory & Henry College, Emory VA
  3. George Mason University, Fairfax VA
  4. James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA
  5. Miller School of Albemarle, Charlottesville VA
  6. Prince Georges County Public Schools, Upper Marlboro MD
  7. Pulaski County High School, Dublin VA
  8. University of Virginia Center for Politics, Charlottesville VA

Wisconsin

  1. Viterbo College, La Crosse WI

Mexico

  1. American School of Durango, Durango MX
  2. American School Foundation of Guadalajara, Guadalajara MX
  3. American School Foundation of Mexico City MX
  4. American School Foundation of Monterrey, Monterrey MX
  5. American School of Puerto Vallarta, Puerto Vallarta MX
  6. Colegio Columbia, Tampico MX
  7. Colegia Ingles Americano, Monterrey MX
  8. Cornerstone Academy, Guadalajara MX
  9. Instituto Thomas Jefferson, Guadalajara MX
  10. International School of Cancun, Cancun MX
  11. The American School of Querétaro, Querétaro MX
  12. Peterson Schools, Mexico City MX

Abroad

  1. Nu’Uuli VoTech High School, Pago Pago
  2. Cheonga Dalton School, Cheonga South Korea

Profiles of three more Advisory Council members

Photos (l-r): Author Michael Hogan with Liam O’Hara, Janet Layton Arribas, Christena Wiseman

The Lincoln and Mexico Project (LAMP) is proud to profile three more members of our international Advisory Council. The full list follows the three profiles.

Liam O’Hara, Guadalajara, Mexico, is the Head of the Social Studies Department at the American School Foundation of Guadalajara (ASFG). He teaches US History, AP Economics, Macroeconomics, and Model United Nations. He is the founder of GUAMUN, the Guadalajara-based Model UN Annual Conference that brings together students from all over Mexico each year. He was one of the earliest pre-publication readers of the manuscript for Abraham Lincoln and Mexico and was instrumental in adding the published book to the APUSH curriculum at his school. In addition to his teaching workload, he is working with author/ historian Michael Hogan, retired APUSH teacher at ASFG, to connect with other APUSH teachers in international schools in Mexico. The overall outreach to international schools is coordinated by Janet Heinze, retired Director General of the ASFG, who is now an international education consultant and a member of the LAMP Advisory Council.

Janet Layton Arribas is a teacher in the Pasadena, California, area and is advising LAMP on ways to reach out to educators in the USA and supply them with LAMP’s supplemental reading material. She is especially interested in raising student awareness of the profound connection between the United States and Mexico, has taught Spanish and Latin in Los Angeles area private schools for over 30 years, and currently teaches at Crestview Preparatory School in La Cañada, California. During her career, she has developed an elementary school Spanish curriculum that includes teaching Spanish language within a historical context. As a historian her work has been published in Perspectives: A Journal of Historical Inquiry and she is a Michael Kimmel Scholarship recipient. She earned a M.A. in History from California State University at Los Angeles, and graduated Cum Laude from Occidental College with a B.A. in Spanish Literature.

Christena Wiseman, Reno, Nevada, is a retired educator at Reno High School who divides her time between Nevada and Mexico. She is helping LAMP develop strategies for outreach to Advanced Placement programs in USA high schools. She received her AP training at Stanford University, her Master’s in Education from the University of Nevada-Reno, and her Bachelor’s degree from California State University in Chico. In Reno, she was the Foreign Language Department Chair, member of seven professional associations, served on the textbook selection committee twice, and served as advisor for the French Club and International Club for over 20 years. In addition, she sat on the first “Jury” for the first DELF ((Diplôme d’études en langue française) in the USA. Outside the classroom, she served for four years as a member of the student assistance program called “Helping Hands,” focused on children at risk.

LAMP relies on Advisory Council members for suggestions and strategies about outreach activities, both to the education community and the public. The Advisory Council includes people of several professions, backgrounds, and ages. Here’s the current list of members:

  1. Janet Layton Arribas, teacher, Pasadena CA area
  2. Ronald Barnett, Ph.D. historian and former professor, Jocotopec, MX
  3. Shaun Arron Cassidy, social media marketing, San Diego CA
  4. Clever Chavez Marin, historian and Mexican military expert, Zapopan, MX
  5. Noor Chehabeddine, Advanced Placement US History (APUSH) student, American School Foundation of Guadalajara (ASFG), Guadalajara, MX
  6. Sylvia N. Contreras, businesswoman, history activist, and LAMP PR representative, Long Beach, CA
  7. Robert DiYanni, Ph.D. Professor, and instructional consultant, Center for the Advancement of Teaching at NYU, New York City
  8. Heribert von Feilitzsch, historian, author, and business executive, Washington DC area
  9. Héctor García Chávez, Director, Latin American-Latinx Studies, Loyola University, Chicago IL
  10. Patricia Gonzalez, Director of Inclusion and Diversity, Emory & Henry College, Emory, VA
  11. Carlos Gonzalez-Magallon, retired Mexican foreign service official, Ajijic, MX
  12. Rocìo Guenther, freelance journalist, San Antonio, TX
  13. Jorge Haynes, retired California State University administrator, Austin, TX
  14. Janet Heinze, international education consultant, Guadalajara, MX
  15. Javier Hernández, photojournalist and reporter, Chihuahua, MX
  16. Cindy A. Medina Gallardo, history activist, genealogist, and LAMP senior PR representative, Austin, TX
  17. Carlos Alberto Méndez Villa, Ministry of Culture, Chihuahua, MX
  18. Luciana Mendez, computer sciences student at DePaul University, Chicago, IL
  19. Liam O’Hara, high school Social Studies Department Head, ASFG, Guadalajara, MX
  20. Stacy Lynn Ohrt-Billingslea, Theatre Director, ASFG, Guadalajara, MX
  21. Brenda Prado, APUSH student, ASFG, Guadalajara, MX
  22. Mark Sconce, author and retired businessman, Camarillo, CA
  23. Jason Silverman, Ph.D. retired university history professor, Rock Hill, SC
  24. Richard Stafford, retired journalist, Washington DC area
  25. Philip Stover, historian and retired deputy superintendent of San Diego Unified School System, Chihuahua, MX
  26. Isaias Torres, APUSH teacher, ASFG, Guadalajara, MX
  27. Christena Wiseman, retired high school educator, Reno NV
  28. David Wogahn, digital publishing executive, Carlsbad CA

If you know someone who might be interested in joining the group, just send an email to lamp@lincolnandmexicoproject.org. Thanks!

Classes over. Planning begins!

 

Photos credits: Quote from educational psychologist Lee S. Shulman; book cover from historian/ educator Michael Hogan

Are you an educator looking for ways to add value to classroom discussions in the Social Studies curriculum for the coming academic year?

The Lincoln and Mexico Project (LAMP) offers the book Abraham Lincoln and Mexico and free lesson plans to help educators examine Lincoln’s legacy of support for Mexico as congressman and president, especially his opposition to the Mexican-American War. It’s also a great way to help stimulate classroom discussion of past, current, and future relations between the USA and Mexico.

Most importantly, the book contains many archival documents—some of which have never been published before. Historian and educator Michael Hogan scoured libraries and government archives in the USA and Mexico to give students a greater understanding of Lincoln as an international statesman, not just an iconic American figure.

Now, his book is in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and many college and university libraries. And many educators are considering the book as supplemental classroom material. Teachers are eagerly adopting Dr. Hogan’s book and the LAMP materials because its 137-page appendix is like holding a reference library with:

  • Archival maps showing the official 1821 border between Mexico and the USA, and a map of disputed territory after Texas was admitted to the union in December 1845
  • All four of Polk’s messages to Congress about the war, including original drafts from 1846 that state his resentment because Mexico refused his efforts to buy California for $25 million
  • Examinations of battlefield journals from soldiers, which reveal personal objections by Ulysses S. Grant to the war
  • Analysis of Lincoln’s “Spot Resolutions” in Congress challenging Polk’s claim that Mexico “has invaded our territory and has shed American blood on the American soil”
  • The complete 1848 treaty that ended the war and gave two-fifths of Mexico to the USA
  • Discussions of how—after Mexico signed the treaty—the US Senate deleted a key provision offering citizenship to Mexicans living in the conquered territory, and struck another provision guaranteeing their property rights

If you would like to look at the book for possible use in your classroom with no obligation, just send a request to lamp@lincolnandmexicoproject.org and we’ll send the .pdf printer’s proof to you along with the lesson plans. More than 100 high schools, colleges, and universities already have the materials, as you can see on the LAMP blog at https://bit.ly/2JR7DYo.

We look forward to your request.

 

International Honor for Historian and Educator Michael Hogan

 

DePaul University of Chicago has selected American School teacher Michael Hogan of Guadalajara as the 2018 honoree of their Celebrating Teachers Award. The award is given for “his outstanding commitment to the field of education and to the well-being of his students.”

This is the first time a teacher in Mexico has been selected for this honor. Dr. Hogan has been invited by the university to attend a special award ceremony in Chicago on June 7. In addition, DePaul University will present a monetary prize on his behalf to the American School of Guadalajara.

 Dr. Hogan initiated the AP Cambridge Capstone Research Program at the American School, an innovative two-year diploma program that provides guided research to students working on community-based projects. The author of twenty-four books including two critically acclaimed histories of the US and Mexico, he began teaching at the American School in 1990, retired in 2004, and then was re-hired as a part-time adjunct in 2014. In the interim, he worked as the Latin American Consultant for the State Department’s Office of Overseas Schools and the deputy director of the College Board in Latin America.

Asked how he felt about receiving the award, Dr. Hogan replied, “I have been blessed with wonderful students, a supportive administration, and fantastic fellow teachers. And the success of my history books, most recently Abraham Lincoln and Mexico, has been extremely rewarding.”

“As supplemental classroom material, the real value of the Lincoln book is that it has remarkably improved the understanding of young people of historical relations between the USA and Mexico, and hopefully will result in a generation of Americans who are more understanding and more tolerant,” he said. “If the award helps publicize the commonalities between Mexico and the US and how we can work together to make a better world, then I am doubly proud to receive it.”

To facilitate classroom discussion, Abraham Lincoln and Mexico includes archival documents about Lincoln’s legacy of support for Mexico as congressman and president. Library copies of the print book are in colleges and universities across the USA including Harvard, the US Military Academy at West Point and the US Naval Academy at Annapolis, the University of Texas, the University of Arizona, and the California State University system. The award-winning eBook version in English and Spanish has become an international best seller on Amazon in both the USA and Mexico for historical books about Latin America.

The international Lincoln and Mexico Project (LAMP) is providing free lesson plans based on the book to any high school or college teacher who requests them, as well as an access code to purchase copies of the eBook direct from LAMP at the discount price of 99 cents for each student. The LAMP supports this education outreach with an Advisory Council of educators, history activists, and business people from Mexico and the USA.

More than 100 universities, colleges, and high schools already have the supplemental classroom materials, and the list is growing every week. The list is on the Lincoln and Mexico Project blog at https://lincolnandmexicoproject.wordpress.com/2018/04/03/educators-like-lamp-classroom-materials/